ANNOUNCING THE SCHEDULE OF SESSIONS FOR THE TV OF TOMORROW SHOW 2017

[itvt] is pleased to announce the schedule of sessions for the TV of Tomorrow Show (June 28th-29th at the Golden Gate Club in the Presidio of San Francisco).

Tickets to TVOT 2017 (priced at $1,275) are still available for purchase here.

Eventbrite - The TV of Tomorrow Show San Francisco 2017 - 11th Anniversary!

We will be announcing more details about a number of TVOT 2017 panels, firesides and presentations in upcoming issues of the [itvt] newsletter.

The official Twitter hashtag of the show is #TVOTSF, and the official Twitter account is @TVOTshow.


8:00-9:00AM
Ventana Room
Registration, Breakfast, Schmoozing and Networking

9:00-9:10AM
Hawthorn Room
Welcoming Address by Tracy Swedlow, Editor-in-Chief of [itvt]

9:10-10:00AM
Hawthorn Room
How to Mobilize a Content Team

The content marketplace is unstable terrain, and our industries rely on visionary talent to imagine its new frontiers. The problem: we rely on anachronistic methods when we organize our content teams around old processes, homogenous perspectives, and echo-chamber logic. In the era of fragmented attention, how do we recruit and manage teams that generate novel and compelling stories? How do we cultivate creative intuition without straitjacketing it into reductive, pseudo-industrial procedure? And in what formation must our content teams position themselves to be resilient and adaptive, as tastes, technologies, and ways of watching proliferate or evaporate altogether? 

Invited to this panel are leaders at the vanguard of digital content, whose collective experience has generated billions of views: together, their work represents a movement that already rivals the reach of the Gutenberg Bible. Their diverse sets of experience prime them to discuss the possibilities and perils of team-building in times where nothing is certain. Panelists include:

9:10-10:00AM
Cypress Room
Blockchain Technology for Programmatic OTT Advertising
 
What if brands, publishers, and ad agencies had access to industry-wide metrics and insights? What if audience segments could be standardized cross-platform? What if re-targeting campaigns could be made more efficient, saving millions in ad dollars lost to fraud? Blockchain technology, lauded for its ability to securely transfer data and ideas between entities, is being touted as the antidote to a number of issues plaguing the ad tech ecosystem. 
 
Blockchain and ad-tech experts will come together on this panel to discuss whether and how this disruptive technology, which has penetrated the worlds of finance and healthcare, could now transform the advertising industry. Topics to be addressed include payments and clearing, predictive analytics, cross-platform data portability and security, standardized segmentation and targeting, transparency, pricing efficiency, ad validation, and more. Panelists include:

 

10:00-10:10AM

  • Coffee Break, Sponsored by Switch Media

10:10-10:40AM
Hawthorn Room
Keynote Fireside: Jennifer Dorian, EVP of 360 Brand Strategy/GM of TCM and FilmStruck, Turner Broadcasting

We will be announcing more details about this session in an upcoming issue of the [itvt] newsletter.

10:40-11:05AM
Hawthorn Room
Keynote Fireside: Chris Ripley, President and CEO, Sinclair Broadcast Group

We will be announcing more details about this session in an upcoming issue of the [itvt] newsletter.

11:05AM-12:00PM
Hawthorn Room
The Future of Video Advertising 

Featuring members of the Turner AdLab Advisory Board, this panel will discuss the current state of video advertising, and insights collected to date about consumer behavior. During a time of significant shifts in media consumption, the Board is developing new ways to measure that behavior while investing in solutions to better the impact of advertising for the industry as a whole. Panelists include:

  • Catharine Hays, Executive Director, The Future of Advertising Program, The Wharton School (UofPenn)
  • Matt Nelson, Head of Strategy, You.i TV
  • Sheri Roder, Chief of WHY, Horizon Media
  • Howard Shimmel, Chief Research Officer, Turner Broadcasting (Moderator)

11:05AM-12:00PM
Cypress Room
The Death of the Remote, and the Rise of the Conversational UI 

For years now, the remote has defined the limitations of user interface (UI) design for the big-screen experience. Menus, rails and walls of image tiles arguably hinder users and make content discovery a real pain point across all platforms. However, new advances in voice technology, machine learning and data analytics promise to liberate digital design from past constraints and make it easier for users to navigate the media landscape.

This session will discuss--from a business, technology and design perspective--the opportunities and challenges in implementing a conversational UI, the state of the technology that underlies it, and some of the solutions currently in the marketplace. Panelists include:

 

12:00-12:25PM
Hawthorn Room
Keynote Fireside: TV Worth Watching in a Multiplatform Age

We will be announcing more details about this session in an upcoming issue of the [itvt] newsletter. Participants include:

  • David Bianculli, Guest Host/TV Critic, "Fresh Air" (NPR); Founder and Editor, TVWorthWatching.com
  • Ben Mankiewicz, Host, Turner Classic Movies/Commentator, The Young Turks
  • Seth Shapiro, Co-Governor, Interactive Media, Television Academy

 

12:00-12:25PM
Cypress Room
I Didn't Know Broadcast Could Do That! A Keynote Fireside with Sam Matheny, CTO of the NAB

Think broadcasting is being left in the dust by Internet delivery? Think again. Broadcasting is about to get an upgrade that brings it crashing into the 21st century. Not only will broadcasting become part of the Internet, it will be able to deliver an experience to rival the best movie theaters have to offer. And do it all without any buffering, ever. Come to this session to learn about the new broadcast features you can take advantage of to make your content shine on every screen in a viewer's possession. You'll also hear about new business models and approaches broadcasters and content providers can take advantage of to broaden their revenue-earning potential. Participants include:

  • Colin Dixon, Founder and Chief Analyst, nScreenMedia
  • Sam Matheny, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, National Association of Broadcasters

12:25-1:15PM
Hawthorn Room
World-Building Showrunners: Creating and Promoting Genre Content in the Multiplatform Age

The present era of multiplatform television, widely considered to be a golden age of high-quality content, relies heavily on world-building by innovative and often experienced showrunners. 
 
Conditioned by exposure to increasingly well-realized TV worlds, from the sci-fi/dystopian/futuristic to the challenging realities of American cities, audiences have high expectations of content worlds and the writers who create them. 
 
This panel will feature renowned sci-fi writer and showrunner Ronald D. Moore (Star Trek TNG & DS9, Battlestar Galactica, Outlander); The Man in the High Castle showrunner Eric Overmyer, chronicler of the American city in all its complicated glory (The Wire, Treme, Bosch); and ascendant digital showrunner John Cabrera (H+: The Digital Series, August One). It will be moderated by [itvt] columnist, Lisa Crawford.
 
Topics of discussion will include: How TV creators have planted the seeds of a future that sometimes (at least partially) comes to pass--in culture, technology, or in other ways; whether world-building has evolved at the creative and management levels, affecting the approach to storytelling and writers' rooms; and what it's like to engage with fans across platforms, and respond to their expectations, as the master of a particular world.

12:25-1:15PM
Cypress Room
Max Headroom: The Modern Marketing Executive

Who would have known that, after 30 years, Max Headroom is becoming a reality? Augmented, Artificial, Automated--or just down right Awesome--Intelligence has been here for a while. 

"Omnichannel" is a word being thrown around by almost every company out there. But It takes a lot more work than pairing TV and digital to make it an omnichannel campaign. It takes a plan to execute, it takes the right data, and systems that are able to optimize. 

As a modern marketer, you need to evolve your data and technology that allow you to create insights, but also ensure you can identify who that person really is….Come listen to some of the leading advocates of using data for performance marketing talk about what challenges our industry faces in the next 6 months and what planning will be needed for the next 6 years. Panelists include:

 

1:15-1:55PM
Lunch, Schmoozing and Networking

 

1:55-2:45PM
Hawthorn Room
Set-Top Box Data: What Have You Done with It Lately? 

We have been working with TV set-top box data for more than 10 years, for targeting or audience measurement or analytics and modeling. Everyone says they are using it, but surprisingly little has been shared. This panel will invite key industry leaders to share real-world examples of how they have used set-top box data, and what they have learned. This will be followed by a discussion about the value of the learnings they have shared, and a conversation on what else these panelists plan to do, as well as potential challenges they face. Panelists include:

1:55-2:45PM
Cypress Room
Tackling TV Sports

This session will examine how established and new players in TV/video sports are reinventing the medium in an era of cord-cutting, multiplatform OTT delivery, immersive entertainment, and increasing use of social media. 

Topics of discussion will include: How traditional TV sports offerings will be impacted by such emerging phenomena as sports-free "skinny bundles" and sports-focused niche vMVPD and SVOD services; the pros and cons of the various social-video and OTT platforms (e.g. Twitter, Amazon Prime, Twitch, etc.) for sports programming, and how successful or otherwise those platforms are proving at reaching and monetizing audiences; whether and how sports programming formats need to be reinvented for those platforms; the emergence of eSports and other new genres of sports programming; the potential of live VR to revolutionize sports coverage; and the ways in which established sports broadcasters are innovating (e.g. developing new interactive viewing experiences, such as multiple camera angles, the incorporation of fantasy sports gaming into sports coverage, etc.) in order to face off the threats posed by new competitors. Panelists include:

2:45-2:55PM
Schmoozing and Networking Break, Sponsored by Breakaway Communications

 

2:55-3:50PM
Hawthorn Room
The Measure of All Things? Understanding the Evolution of TV Measurement

This session will explore new measurement and data-analytics technologies and methodologies that are emerging in response to consumers' increasingly fragmented, multiplatform viewing habits, and debate their likely impact on such areas as advanced advertising, SVOD, the composition of programming bundles, and beyond. 

Questions to be addressed include: What challenges stand in the way of developing a cross-platform measurement currency for TV, digital and mobile, and is doing so ultimately even feasible? How can media companies best leverage new data collection and analysis techniques in order to provide useful and accurate metrics for programmatic and addressable advertising buyers? Is there a need for standardization in the measurement/data space and, if so, in which areas? What will be the impact on the rapidly emerging SVOD space of new services that allow measurement of actual viewership (as opposed to subscription numbers)? How significant could the new ATSC 3.0 standard be for the measurement/data space? And how effective is the industry proving at measuring quality vs. quantity--i.e. what progress has been made in terms of measuring engagement with (vs. raw viewing of) programming and commercials and in terms of tracking ROI on ad campaigns? Panelists include:

2:55-3:50PM
Cypress Room
Navigating the New Distribution Environment

The first quarter of 2017 saw an unprecedented rise in cord-cutting, with pay-TV companies losing a total of 762,000 video customers. Meanwhile, a plethora of new virtual MVPD's, skinny bundles, niche SVOD services and other OTT offerings is emerging to fill the gap; and social-media giants such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat are also now rolling out extensive programming line-ups. 

This session--which will explore how programming-distribution strategies are adapting to a rapidly evolving and increasingly fragmented TV/video marketplace--will feature a panel of executives who are at the forefront of navigating this uncertain new environment. In addition to explaining how they are innovating their own companies' distribution strategies in the face of seismic change, and how--in the process of doing that--they have addressed such issues as how to maintain their brands in an increasingly fluid and multiplatform TV universe, panelists will share their thoughts on how they see the distribution environment evolving over the coming months and years. Panelists include:

3:50-4:45PM
Hawthorn Room
Audience-Based Buying and Measurement

As the practice of data-driven, audience-based buying moves from the digital world into both linear TV and OTT, there are particular challenges unique to the TV media-buying environment. For instance, when a network sells inventory in the Upfront Market, how does it forecast an audience target, such as heavy frozen pizza eaters, nine months into the future when a campaign runs? And the data sources used to make this forecast don't balance their data according to the universe of frozen pizza eaters, since TV measurement firms such as Nielsen weight and balance their panels according to demographics, not the millions of potential audience characteristics. Additionally, when the data are used for sales attribution analyses, the data sources may have changed between planning, executing and analyzing the campaign. Hear how the industry is coping with this new measurement as a prerequisite to moving forward with digital and TV convergence. Panelists include:

3:50-4:45PM
Cypress Room
AR²: Augmented Reality and Augmented Revenue

In the constant barrage of discussions and press about Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality, VR tends to get more attention. That's reasonable, perhaps, inasmuch as VR is bigger, fancier, snazzier and vastly more expensive to produce. Which is OK if you have a James Cameron-size budget and a matching audience. But if you want to maximize the "Wow" Factor on a manageable budget, AR may be the way to go. At its peak, Pokemon Go--the superstar of AR--had 65 million monthly active users, and those are numbers that make everybody sit up and take notice. 

This panel will focus on real-world opportunities to engage brands, networks, advertisers and consumers with Augmented Reality technology that is available and affordable today. Panelists include:

4:45-5:40PM
Hawthorn Room
"Moving Pictures"--Speeding to the Intersection of Future Mobility and Video

Connected cars, smart cities, autonomous self-driving vehicles, mobility-on-demand....The global transportation and mobility industry is rapidly evolving, and the advent of disruptive new elements, such as connected and autonomous cars, is creating new opportunities for digital video content, advertising and services to be offered to a new interactive viewership market: the connected driver and the autonomous "rider."

This session will feature experts from the mobility and transportation industry who are helping to lead these revolutionary changes in the US and abroad. They include:

4:45-5:40PM
Cypress Room
ATSC 3.0 and the Future of Broadcast TV

The new ATSC 3.0 standard is widely believed not only to be crucial to the future of local broadcast TV, but to have the potential to make local broadcasters key players in the TV of tomorrow. Indeed, Chris Ripley, CEO of TV station group, Sinclair Broadcast, recently stated that "if the broadcast industry wants to prosper and thrive in this new IP world, there is no choice besides ATSC 3.0." 

The standard is not only expected to enable local broadcasters to offer innovative video services, but to catalyze deployment of advanced advertising, to facilitate generation of the data that make such advertising possible, to allow the delivery of substantially more content, and (for example, thanks to its incorporation of conditional-access technology) to make possible new business models.

In this session, panelists who are at the center of the push to implement ATSC 3.0 will provide insight into the new standard and the technologies it brings together, outline the new video services it is expected to enable, debate its impact on advertising and other TV business models, discuss ongoing efforts to educate the market about its potential, and identify any issues that might delay its deployment. Panelists include:

5:40-7:30PM
Ventana Room and Beyond
Cocktail Reception, Sponsored by comScore!

 

8:00-9:00AM
Ventana Room
Registration, Breakfast, Schmoozing and Networking

9:00-9:05AM
Hawthorn Room
Welcoming Address by Tracy Swedlow, Editor-in-Chief of [itvt]

9:05-9:30AM
Hawthorn Room
VR Keynote: Rikard Steiber, President of HTC Viveport

 

Last April, HTC launched Viveport, a $6.99-per-month subscription service across 30+ countries for users of its Vive VR headset, in what it described as a bid to "democratize access to high-end VR experiences" and to create "a more than $100 million market opportunity for VR developers in the next two years." According to the company, the service was already seeing 100,000 unique users per week in the first month after the launch; and earlier this month, it announced that 75 more titles would now be available through the service, doubling the size of its library. In addition, it revealed that it is seeking to make the service available to users of other companies' VR headsets. 

In this keynote session, Rikard Steiber, the executive in charge of Viveport, will discuss how users are responding to Viveport to date, outline the company's roadmap for the service, and share his thoughts on how VR technology, content, usage and business models are likely to evolve over the coming months and years.

 

9:05-9:30AM

Cypress Room
Creator Keynote: Chef John of Food Wishes

With close to 3 million subscribers and nearly 400 million views, Chef John (John Mitzewich), host of the YouTube cooking-instruction channel, Food Wishes, is one of the most successful social-video chefs. His videos are distinguished by the simple practicality (and, of course, immense tastiness) of his recipes, by his witty commentary, and by the fact that only his hands appear on camera, "keeping," as he puts it, "the focus on the food." In this fireside keynote with Jay Holzer, Head of Global Production and Development at Tastemade, Chef John will discuss his contributions to the evolution of the online recipe-video genre, outline the indispensible role that interaction with his audience has played in the development of his unique style of programming, and share his thoughts on how the genre might evolve going forward.

 

9:30-10:00AM
Hawthorn Room
Creator Keynote: The Young Turks​

 

We will be announcing more details about this session in an upcoming issue of the [itvt] newsletter. Participants include:

9:30-10:00AM
Cypress Room
Programmatic TV Keynote: Aaron Radin, SVP of Partnerships and Portfolio Products, NBCUniversal

We will be announcing more details about this session in an upcoming issue of the [itvt] newsletter. 

10:00-10:15AM
Coffee Break, Sponsored by Switch Media

 

10:15-11:10AM
Hawthorn Room
VR Creator-Technologist Roundtable

This session will bring together 1) representatives of companies at the forefront of developing new VR technologies and capabilities, and 2) creatives who are pioneering storytelling and other forms of artistic endeavor in the new medium, in order to engage in a dialog and exchange of ideas about the medium's future. The goal of the session is to determine what kinds of new technologies and features VR creatives feel they need most, while simultaneously exploring the creative and monetization potential of new technologies, platforms and services that are currently in development.

In addition to attempting to visualize how the interplay of technology and creativity will shape the future of the medium, panelists will share their learnings from creating VR entertainment, asking whether it is possible yet to define the genre rules for storytelling in each of the current varieties of VR; cast light on how audiences have been reacting to VR experiences to date; debate the efficacy of attempts to monetize the new medium; and outline the technological and market challenges that must still be overcome in order for VR to become a mass entertainment medium. Panelists include:


10:15-11:10AM
Cypress Room
OTT TV Infrastructure Roundtable

This panel, consisting of representatives of companies and organizations at the forefront of developing the infrastructure for streaming video, will identify--and elucidate for the layperson--significant new technologies that have emerged to enable the delivery of OTT programming services, and explore their potential to enable those services to employ new business models and offer new user experiences. 

In addition to imparting practical wisdom, panelists will be invited to put on their futurist hats and predict how the OTT/multiplatform TV infrastructure will evolve over the coming months and years and to speculate on which new technologies coming down the pike will drive that evolution. Panelists include:

11:10AM-12:05PM
Hawthorn Room
Beyond the Daydream: A 360-Degree View of the Consumer Reality of VR

There has been a lot of speculation around consumer perceptions and adoption of Virtual Reality--but now we have hard data. This session will feature highlights of consumer insights from Magid's VR/AR Insights Consortium consumer tracking study, and a stellar lineup of panelists rolling up their sleeves in the space. They include:

  • Andy Gorski, Director of Marketing, Home Theater, Audio, Digital Imaging and Entertainment, Best Buy
  • Jeffrey Grant, SVP of Research, Turner Emerging Consumers, Turner Broadcasting
  • Liz Huszarik, EVP of Media Research and Insights, Warner Bros. Entertainment
  • Debby Ruth, Senior Vice President, Frank N. Magid Associates (Moderator)
  • Additional Panelists TBA

11:10AM-12:05PM
Cypress Room
New Formats for New Audiences: Understanding Social-Video Programming

This session will explore the new programming formats that are emerging on social-video platforms (including YouTube, Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook Live, and others), examine how these new formats are being consumed by their (primarily) Millennial and Gen-Z audiences, and assess how effectively they can be monetized.

Topics to be addressed include: What kinds of programs are proving popular on which social-video platforms (e.g. tech shows on live-streaming platforms, cooking shows on YouTube, etc.) and why? What "genre rules" are emerging for programming on each platform? How are viewers finding the social-video programming that interests them--what are the discoverability issues of the various platforms? How are relationships between creators and audiences evolving on each platform? How positively are audiences reacting to the attempts by networks and other traditional content providers to develop social-video programming--or are these established players, as one observer recently put it, "trying to force TV-like behaviors on a post-TV world"? And how much potential for monetization (whether through advertising, branded content, influencer marketing or subscription) does social-video programming hold--or should recent developments such as the YouTube advertising controversy and Disney's decision to drastically reduce the number of social-video stars it works with give cause for concern? Panelists include:

 

12:05-1:00PM
Hawthorn Room
Appraising the Potential of Programmatic TV

As television increasingly becomes an IP-based medium, many observers believe that programmatic TV's fortunes are on the upswing--and the recent high-profile launch of programmatic TV by Dish Network's OTT service, Sling TV, could certainly give credence to that belief. Nevertheless, many in the industry still have doubts about programmatic, citing such reasons as entrenched advertising-agency practices and the fact that the national TV inventory market already works very efficiently, with inventory consistently selling out.

This session will bring together programmatic TV believers and skeptics, in order to debate its future. Topics to be addressed include the significance of Sling TV's programmatic TV launch and other recent developments, such as Sinclair's announcement of plans to launch a programmatic advertising co-op and Google's announcement that it is opening up linear-TV inventory to programmatic buying via its DoubleClick Bid Manager; the potential impact on the programmatic TV space of the new ATSC 3.0 standard and the improved data-collection it promises; the technological hurdles and entrenched business practices that stand in the way of wide deployment of programmatic TV; and the extent to which the oft-expressed industry fear is justified that programmatic TV will lead to a "race to the bottom." Panelists include:

12:05-1:00PM
Cypress Room
Marketing to Social-Video Natives

According to a recent survey by Anatomy Media, 2 out of 3 Millennials have installed ad-blocking software on the devices on which they stream video. This session will bring together some of the most prominent experts in branded content, influencer marketing and other new marketing techniques, in order to explore how marketing is being reinvented to reach young social-video natives.

Topics to be addressed include: Which social-video platforms are proving most effective for branded content and influencer marketing and why, and what kinds of brands are seeing the most success with these marketing methods? How to measure the effectiveness of branded-content and influencer-marketing campaigns? What are the differences between Millennials and Gen Z in terms of video-consumption habits and susceptibility to different kinds of marketing strategies? How does one go about making a video "go viral"? If, as many believe, less is more with branded content, how can campaigns, as one commentator recently put it, "take the brand out of branded content," while still remaining effective? And what challenges--including such issues as brand safety and the FTC's concerns about transparency--do these new forms of marketing face? Panelists include:

 

1:00-1:40PM
Lunch, Schmoozing and Networking

 

1:40-2:30PM
Hawthorn Room
Live Streaming: Going with the Flow

85. That is the percentage of Millennials who watch live streaming video. The phenomenon of live streaming is growing, and will impact TV and video in its current form. Whether you see it as further fragmentation of viewing options or as a potential opportunity, the implications stand to be significant. China is the bellwether in this space, but what are the US trends and implications for the greater video landscape? Learn about the potential scenarios emerging and what they mean for the future of TV and online video. Panelists include:

  • Mike Bloxham, SVP of National Television and Video, Frank N. Magid Associates
  • Katy Ferguson, EVP/Managing Partner, Entertainment, Horizon Media
  • Jeffrey Grant, SVP of Research, Turner Emerging Consumers, Turner Broadcasting
  • Additional Panelists TBA

1:40-2:30PM
Cypress Room
Addressable TV: Beyond the 1-2%

According to a recent survey by Advertiser Perceptions, 6 out of 10 advertisers that are currently using addressable TV consider it an "essential part" of their media mix, 38% characterize it as a "must buy," and 54% plan to increase their addressable spend over the next year--by an average of 10%. Yet despite addressability's popularity with those who have used it, only 1-2% of TV inventory is currently addressable.

This session will examine what the industry can do in order to increase deployment of addressable TV, and will also identify new developments that appear set to boost its growth. Questions to be discussed include: How well are addressable TV's advocates educating the market, and what kinds of proof-points are still needed in order to convince skeptics? What new data sources and data types, beyond traditional age-and-gender demographics, are data companies developing in order to make addressable TV more effective? What kinds of advertisers and what kinds of campaigns is addressable working best for and why? What is being done in order to increase the medium's accountability--is there a need, for example, for standards for media deliverability? What are the implications for addressable TV of the planned Sinclair-Tribune merger and the new ATSC 3.0 standard? And what is the potential of cross-screen addressable, creative versioning and other innovations in the medium that we can we expect to see over the coming months? Panelists include:

2:30-3:20PM
Hawthorn Room
News Programming in the Age of Social Media

Despite the oft-discussed issue of TV news's "graying" audience, younger viewers are in fact quite heavily engaged with news and current events--albeit primarily on digital platforms: according to recent research from comScore, Millennials' news consumption is actually heavier than that of the average digital news consumer. 

This session will explore how news programming--and news reporting--are being rethought for (and by) social-media/digital natives, with panelists identifying the specific ways in which those natives are consuming new forms of news programming on social and other digital platforms--and also using those platforms to report the news themselves. Panelists will also debate the socio-political implications of these changes in news consumption and generation--including the question of whether the fact that news is increasingly being received and reported through social networks and digital platforms is causing ideological polarization and a deluge of "fake news"; and identify how traditional news providers are developing new ways of delivering and presenting news programming in order to win back social-media/digital natives. Panelists include:

2:30-3:20PM
Cypress Room
OTT and Consumer Empowerment
 
The days of "set-it-and-forget-it" entertainment are officially over. Long-term cable contracts, limited choices and plain old inertia have been the staples of the television industry and translated into somewhat complacent, if not dissatisfied, but basically trapped and powerless customers. But now, the age of entertainment choice is upon us. Due to the constant flow of new entrants into the streaming space, the ease of canceling online streaming services and an increasing comfort level with technology, consumers have an unprecedented amount of control over their entertainment mix. While this is great news for consumers, it has created a bit of a volatile environment for OTT providers, content producers, and even the consumers themselves. This panel will discuss the challenges and opportunities that this new reality has created. Panelists include:

3:20-3:30PM
Schmoozing and Networking Break, Sponsored by Breakaway Communications

 

3:30-4:20PM
Hawthorn Room
Understanding the OTT Content Ecosystem: SVOD, Skinny Bundles and Beyond

This session will explore the contours of the OTT content ecosystem (including subscription- and ad-supported VOD services, skinny bundles, niche programming offerings and more) and debate its likely future trajectory and its potential impact on the TV industry as a whole. 

Questions to be addressed include: If one of the major strengths of OTT programming services is their ability to generate granular data on viewer behavior, how well have they been leveraging this advantage to date? How will the accountability enabled by new cross-platform audience-measurement methodologies impact the space? To what extent are OTT programming services' user experiences and business models restricted by the expectations and established business practices of their content providers, and how much progress have they made in innovating the presentation and discoverability of content through personalization and other methods--are they, as one prominent commentator recently put it, still "hamstrung by the legacy of broadcast TV"? How are OTT programming services being marketed to consumers, and what is being done to address their high rates of churn? How will issues with the delivery infrastructure on which they rely--such as ISP data caps and the FCC's plans to reverse Title II net neutrality--impact their development? And what will be the impact on the space of social-media/video giants such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Snapchat rolling out new programming services? Panelists include:

4:20-5:10PM
Hawthorn Room
Pay-TV Embraces OTT

The pay-TV industry is slowly but surely embracing the major OTT platforms, as evidenced by Comcast and Altice bringing Netflix and Hulu (respectively) into their platforms and into their program guides. 

Does this effectively put an end to cord-cutting, now that viewers can get broadband and SVOD from the same provider? 

If the MVPD's get greater stickiness, the SVOD platforms get free marketing and more customers, and consumers get a vastly improved interface--are there really any downsides? 

Is this the death of the set-top box too, as MVPD's embrace BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) and continue to build out TV Everywhere-style apps for connected devices like Roku?

And finally, is all this just the forerunner of a move to a library-based system where the assumption is that most shows will be watched on-demand rather than live, and if so, what does that do to the underlying economics of the television industry? Panelists include:

5:10-6:00PM
Hawthorn Room
TVOT 2017 "Grand Finale": Content Discovery, UX and the TV of Tomorrow

This session will bring together prominent experts in content discovery and UX design, in order to explore how new ways of finding and presenting programming content have the potential to fundamentally change not only the viewer's experience of television but significant areas of the television business itself. 

Topics to be discussed include: Learnings that can be drawn from the latest research into the content-discovery field; how personalized recommendations and other innovations could enable content providers to monetize their programming catalogs more effectively; the implications for the advertising industry of new developments in content discovery; the role that artificial intelligence and machine learning will play in improving the metadata and algorithms that power discovery; the status of "peak content" and how it raises the stakes for TV discovery; how the growing number of platforms and providers "per viewer" increases the challenge of discovery; how the shift in TV consumption affects the need to leverage brands of shows vs. networks vs. providers; and how content providers and aggregators must rethink branding and UX when the discovery and consumption of content is increasingly taking place across platforms. As is always the case with TVOT's "Grand Finale" session, expect lots of audience participation! Panelists include:


TVOT SF 2017 "Agents Provocateurs":

Region: 
North America