News Round-Up

Twitter 360 for the iPhone 3GS with Augmented Reality

--Artivision Integrates its Target-Ad Service with Kaltura's Open Source Broadband Video Platform
--Denmark's Comtech to Use never.no's Interactive TV Technology at Conference Facilities, Retailers
--NDS Appoints New Indian Reseller
--Nielsen Provides More Info on its Single-Source Measurement Plan
--New iPhone Augmented Reality App Takes Advantage of Twitter's New Geotagging Feature
--YouTube Said to Be in Discussions about Streaming TV Shows on Pay-Per-View Basis

Here is a round-up of some other interactive TV-related stories we didn't have room for in this issue:

  • Kaltura, a company that offers what it bills as the first open source broadband video platform, contacted [itvt] Tuesday to let us know that Artivision has joined its partner program and integrated its Target-Ad "in-video monetization service" with the Kaltura platform. According to Artivision, Target-Ad generates "smart ad placements that adapt in real time for optimal performance and viewing experience" and "leverages advanced video content analysis to automatically find and map IAB standard ad units within areas that do not interfere with the user's viewing experience."
  • Norwegian interactive TV software company, never.no (note: for an example of an application powered by the company's technology, see the article published on itvt.com, July 1st), has announced a partnership with Comtech Experience A/S to provide interactive communication tools for the retail sector and for conference facilities in Denmark. "At conferences, Comtech will use never.no technology to enable visitors to use mobile phone texting to ask questions to presenters in real time, or to order workplace delivery of collateral information--eliminating the annoyance of lugging reams of paper around an exhibit hall," the companies say. "In retail, Comtech's use of [never.no's flagship] Interactivity Suite will provide store and mall owners the ability to target individual shoppers with customized content delivered on point-of-sale screens."
  • Interactive TV and conditional access technology provider, NDS, has appointed Surbhi Broadband as an authorized reseller for its pay-TV solutions in India, including its MediaHighway middleware, its VideoGuard conditional access technology and its EPG's.
  • Nielsen has announced that it will complete a full roll-out of Web video measurement as part of its existing TV panel by August 31st, 2010; and also says that it will shortly unveil a timeline for tracking Web video viewing that will help media companies and agencies to better understand viewing behavior between the TV and Web. Broadcasting & Cable has more.
  • French augmented reality company, Presselite, has launched Twitter 360, an AR application specifically developed for the Apple iPhone 3GS. According to the company, the new app is "one of the first iPhone applications to use the new Twitter Geotagging feature"; "enables you to visualize your Twitter friends located in your nearby environment" and view their latest tweets; and "annotates your tweets with GPS location information" so that "your friends can now see, via augmented reality, the location from where your last tweet was posted." More information is available on the new app's dedicated Web site. A demo video is embedded above.
  • According to an article by Peter Kafka of All Things Digital, YouTube is attempting to convince the TV industry to allow it to stream individual TV shows on a pay-per-view basis. While YouTube's discussions with networks and studios are still "preliminary," Kafka says, the Google-owned video sharing company "envisions something similar to what Apple and Amazon already offer: First-run shows, without commercials, for $1.99 an episode, available the day after they air on broadcast or cable." While the service would be asking consumers to pay the same for a one-off stream of an episode as they would pay on iTunes or Amazon for a download that they can view at will, Kafka points out that one possible strategy for YouTube would be to focus the service on long- and mid-tail content that is not available in other online locations.

 

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